I can NOT install Anaconda correctly on my Windows laptop

Look carefully at the code—what determines the radiai and width of the chart segments? Are they fixed/hardcoded, or perhaps generated…(pseudo)-randomly? Also, try re-running the code again from scratch—do you see the same result as before? That will answer your question as to why they look different for you than the author…

I wouldn’t call Spyder dated (though of course I’m one of its developers); it is still very actively developed and we’re on pace to have released three major versions in about four or so years, and most if not close to all of the main user-facing features of Jupyter/JuptyerLab and a good deal more (aside from HTML plots and visualizations, which we’re working on), works with IPython consoles and Jupyter kernels and frontends natively (in fact, we help develop/maintain some of the frontend and backend infra) and can work with Jupyter notebooks directly via the first-party Spyder-Notebook plugin.

Jupyter can be a useful tool for learning, experimentation and reporting/documenting results, but once you’re ready to move on to reproducible and re-usable research, Spyder fills an important gap that the notebook ecosystem, despite tens of millions and thousands of hours of investment, just isn’t that well suited for (including for some of the reasons you mention).

Yup, those are but a few of the caveats of relying on notebooks; many of them can be mitigated by a solid understanding of what’s going on behind the scenes and the pitfalls to avoid, and following good development practices with care and attention, but especially by the time you get to that that point you’re likely to really start feeling its more advanced limitations anyway that real IDEs like Spyder address (while in Spyder’s case also striving to be simple and accessable to new, non-expert scientific users). Joel Grus has a great and hilarious presentation (at JupyterCon, no less) highlighting all of these gremlins…

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