Python 3.11.9 is available

Python 3.11 release logo

:warning: This is the last bug fix release of Python 3.11 :warning:

This is the ninth and last bug fix release of Python 3.11

Python 3.11.9 is the newest patch release of the 3.11 series of the Python programming language, and it contains many new features and optimizations.

Major new features of the 3.11 series, compared to 3.10

Some of the new major new features and changes in Python 3.11 are:

General changes

  • PEP 657 – Include Fine-Grained Error Locations in Tracebacks
  • PEP 654 – Exception Groups and except*
  • PEP 680 – tomllib: Support for Parsing TOML in the Standard Library
  • gh-90908 – Introduce task groups to asyncio
  • gh-34627 – Atomic grouping ((?>...)) and possessive quantifiers (*+, ++, ?+, {m,n}+) are now supported in regular expressions.
  • The Faster CPython Project is already yielding some exciting results. Python 3.11 is up to 10-60% faster than Python 3.10. On average, we measured a 1.22x speedup on the standard benchmark suite. See Faster CPython for details.

Typing and typing language changes

  • PEP 673 – Self Type
  • PEP 646 – Variadic Generics
  • PEP 675 – Arbitrary Literal String Type
  • PEP 655 – Marking individual TypedDict items as required or potentially-missing
  • PEP 681 – Data Class Transforms

More resources

And now for something completely different

A kugelblitz is a theoretical astrophysical object predicted by general relativity. It is a concentration of heat, light or radiation so intense that its energy forms an event horizon and becomes self-trapped. In other words, if enough radiation is aimed into a region of space, the concentration of energy can warp spacetime so much that it creates a black hole. This would be a black hole whose original mass–energy was in the form of radiant energy rather than matter, however as soon as it forms, it is indistinguishable from an ordinary black hole.

We hope you enjoy the new releases!

Thanks to all of the many volunteers who help make Python Development and these releases possible! Please consider supporting our efforts by volunteering yourself or through organization contributions to the Python Software Foundation.

Your release team,
Pablo Galindo Salgado @pablogsal
Ned Deily @nad
Steve Dower @steve.dower
Łukasz Langa @ambv

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