Twitter thread re: Big Picture


(Chris Jerdonek) #1

There’s an interesting big picture discussion happening re: packaging that started on Twitter yesterday.

I thought it would be worth mentioning here for a couple reasons: to draw attention to it, and to provide a possible place with fewer UX constraints to continue the discussion. The success of the latter depends in part though on whether people on all sides of the issue have Discourse accounts and choose to participate.

(Warning: the thread has a lot of deep branches, so it’s hard to know what nodes provide the best entry points. Thus, I linked only to what I saw as the root node.)

Edit: I think this might be a better entry point to the discussion. (The other link’s starting thread is more about consultants, B Corps, etc. which is less relevant to this group’s focus.)


(Pradyun Gedam) #2

Thank you for opening this discussion here @cjerdonek!


(Antoine Pitrou) #3

I’m a bit lost: what are we supposed to discuss about?


(Chris Jerdonek) #4

The idea or hope was for people participating in the Twitter discussion (at least some of them) to continue their discussion here. It’s very hard to follow the discussion on Twitter, and important ideas IMO were being expressed. But if they don’t do so, then I’m not sure the discussion would be worth having. (I do encourage you to try to read the thread, though, if you can track it all down.)

(And yes, I did tell the people on Twitter about this post.)


(Bernat Gabor) #5

Some discussion started on Structured, Exchangeable lock file format (requirements.txt 2.0?)


(Steve Dower) #6

Discussions are difficult to move when people keep replying in the original place, and I actually quite enjoyed the rapid pace of Twitter for this one (though nothing being discussed was new to me).

It’s probably best to pick the topic that’s worth following up on and starting that thread. For packaging, I’m not sure what that is right now. Maybe a vision doc and definition of target audience for the things that PyPA does, and an honest evaluation of which tools currently satisfy that audience (in two clear steps - one thing that came up was that we need a lot of peoples input on who target audience is).

This may also not make much sense into the same thing is done for Python itself. It sounded like at least one council member (Carol) wants to do this, so it may happen.


(Brett Cannon) #7

That’s because you were not automatically included in every reply. :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:


(Steve Dower) #8

Really? There was more that I didn’t see? I’m sure I had 99+ notifications (certainly saw 30+ more than three times)


(Pradyun Gedam) #9

For those (like me) trying to keep up with that Twitter thread, I’d suggest https://github.com/paulgb/Treeverse which helps make the heavily threaded nature of the discussion easier to visualize and read.

FWIW, I don’t want to shift the discussion here anymore. I think it’s a good idea to link to that thread from here (visibility, discoverability etc) and vice versa. We should probably note down any actionable items from the Twitter discussion into a single place and this thread can serve for that.


(Chris Jerdonek) #10

One of the things I learned from that thread is that there are people and groups of people (companies, etc) that should be talking to one another but aren’t – to the larger detriment of the Python community and ecosystem. For example, here is one comment Nathaniel made last night:

this libstdc++ thing sounds way worse than I realized. Are they literally vendoring their own libstdc++? And then also doing something to break all the encapsulation stuff we do? I thought they were still running auditwheel to get isolation, despite using the wrong toolchain

which lead to this Warehouse issue (#5420) being filed.

Where should those discussions that need to be happening take place? Twitter? Among individuals rather than in a more open forum? I know we can’t force people to talk about things on Discourse, but I thought this was the forum we set up for that purpose?

Independent of that, can someone with a good understanding of the issue give a bird’s eye summary of what the larger issue is?

Like, here is one comment from Peter Wang (Co-Founder & CTO of Anaconda) that drew my eye:

I don’t have any silver bullets to suggest. I’m merely cautioning against “good enough incrementalism” because I don’t think it’s enough to get us across this adaptive valley, at the speed that our users need.
Maybe it’s a time for a long, hard look at Python’s module/pkg system.

Incidentally, Peter was also a candidate for the Steering Council.

His comment was both a bit concerning to me, as well as mysterious, because I didn’t know what he was getting at by the last sentence.


(Antoine Pitrou) #11

Amusing, at a time when people are promoting the supposed improvement of linear discussions (Discourse-like) over traditional threaded discussions.


(Antoine Pitrou) #12

@pzwang You’re being mentioned here :wink:


(Pradyun Gedam) #13
Click to see a tree visualization of the twitter thread, from about an hour ago.

Yea, I had a similar take-away from this. This is a conversation to be had – how to better communicate with folks external to PyPA about Python Packaging. I remember there were some discussions regarding this elsewhere but I’ll avoid digression here.

This category was set up as an equivalent to distutils-sig, so the scope of it is the same as that; though I don’t think we have as many people who have adopted this vs distutils-sig. FWIW, I think we’ve definitely had much more discussion here than on the mailing list since we added this category.

I prefer linear discussion formats too but that’s a discussion for another category. :stuck_out_tongue:


(Chris Jerdonek) #14

I think “engage” might be a better word. The issue seems a bit broader than improving how PyPA communicates because it seems like the communication isn’t even happening in the first place, because of silos, different priorities, etc. For example, @njs mentioned on Twitter that some promising conversations had started at PyCon, but stopped after that. Or if there is communication, it’s just one way from PyPA outwards (through its PEPs, release notes, and deprecation warnings, etc) rather than bidirectional. I agree this would be worth spinning out its own topic: how to engage the wider community and stakeholders and the proper forum for that, etc.

Edit: Actually, there are some places where sustained bidirectional communication is happening with a broad group. The various issue trackers are one example. But I’m not sure to what extent major stakeholders participate there.


(Inada Naoki) #15

When we communicate with many Python users, we need to follow hundreds of messages.
But it is difficult to follow hundreds of message on Twitter or ML.

Personally speaking, I like reddit UI. For example, there is a thread about PEP 582.

We can fold subthread when not interested in it.
We can upvote messages including some important thing.
We can downvote messages based on misunderstanding.
And when there are many downvotes, subthread is folded by default.

Another example which having 100+ comments.


(Tzu-ping Chung) #16

The nested comment UI of Reddit, HackerNews, etc. is tailored for threads that the majority of the participants don’t read in whole. Folding hides irrelevant messages (whether decided by the user or the system), and votes prioritise “good” messages so people can choose to read only top ones.

Discourse works more like mailing lists, and is designed more toward users that tend to read every message in threads. In that case, folding is not that useful since the user reads the conversation as it happens (instead of all at once a while after it took place), and ordering by relevance either since everything is going to be read anyway (and ordering by time at least gives you extra context between comments).

Both of the designs are useful for their usages, as evident by their equal popularities, but for the specific goal of this forum, Discourse is the correct choice IMO.